5 Translation Technologies Every Translator Should Know About.

Want to know of up-and-coming technologies in the translation and interpretation field? Being a translator or an interpreter, like any other business or job, is done best when on top of the world news concerning your profession. Check out the list below and find out more.

1. SpeechTrans Bluetooth Wearable Wristband

A mouthful right? Aside from the name it does bring convenience to your life. Keep this wristband on your wrist, link it to your Bluetooth on your phone and you’ll never have to pull out your phone again. This means all those phone calls, music and your contact list can all be handled on your wearable wristband.

Sounds cool, but what does it have to do with translators and interpreters?

The SpeechTrans also works with the SpeechTrans Ultimate app, which is available for Android and iPhones. This app, once activated, works with Nuance’s Dragon NaturallySpeaking to translate the spoken language in one of 44 different languages.

If you want to keep your conversations private, plug in an earpiece and microphone into the wearable wristband and you’ll be set to go!

uno-noteband-spritz-wristband

2. Skype Translation

Unfortunately for the Skype corporation, like many others it, has misused the word “Translation.” From what Skype appears to have done with their technology, the name should be Skype interpretation. It works by have both (or more) parties lock onto a voice or video session and speak to each other in different languages. Skype then interprets the language in both text on the screen and in your earpiece with a not-so robotic voice.

Currently, Skype translation is only available in Spanish and English, but recently Microsoft demoed a real-time translation between German and English at the Code Conference in California. Some were not impressed. One German-speaking audience member referred the Skype “Translation” as more for travel purposes, not business. Despite this, Skype assures its consumers that many more languages are underway.

3.Google’s Translate Smartphone App 

Sure, there are all sorts of translation apps. There are many from long ago, and many more that will crop up for years to come. So, what makes Google’s Smartphone App different? As of right now, it seems to be one of the more popular free translation smartphone apps, and as reliable as a free translation app can be.

The app recognizes 17 different languages while speaking. For the translation to work, the user simply speaks into the smartphone and waits. The speech is then recorded, send through Google’s speech recognition servers and then works to transcribe the text. The text is then made into an audio file and sent to the user. All in the matter of seconds.

4. Facebook’s Translation Tool

Facebook has had this option for quite sometime (since last October), but it’s still good to bring up. Have friends that speak a foreign language? Never fear! Facebook has made it possible for you to translate the text instantly.

Because of the high market of non-English speaking individuals, the translation in Facebook was a high priority. Like with Google Chrome giving you the opportunity to translate foreign sites, Facebook translates foreign posts.

5. Ortsbro

Rather than the usual reliance on machine translations and various algorithms, this translation app is a social networking platform. The translations are made in real-time with Google Talk and Facebook Chat. Most of the information through the app is taken care by its vast 53 languages. All  that’s expected of the user? The selection of an output language

This app is for Android and iPhone, and is available for face-to-face chat in iPad or Windows Phone app “one2one.”

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